In this course, we will explore the diverse and complex interactions between the brain and the immune system from the perspective of current, cutting-edge research papers. In particular, we will focus on the molecular mechanisms of these interactions and their role in brain development and function as well as their potential contributions to specific neurological disorders, including autism. In the process, students will learn to read, critically evaluate, and explain in presentations the content of articles from the primary literature. Lisa M. Boulanger.

This lecture and laboratory course will acquaint non-science majors with classical and modern neuroscience. Lectures will give an overview at levels ranging from molecular signaling to cognitive science with a focus on the neuroscience of everyday life, from the general (love, memory, and personality) to the particular (jet lag, autism, and near death experiences). The laboratory will offer hands-on experience in recording signals from single neurons, examining neural structures, and analysis of whole-brain functional brain imaging data. Anthony E. Ambrosini, Samuel S. Wang, Alan Gelperin

An introduction to cognitive brain functions, including higher perceptual functions, attention and selective perception, systems for short- and long-term memory, language, cerebral lateralization, motor control, executive functions of the frontal lobe, cognitive development and plasticity. Major neuropsychological syndromes (e.g., agnosia, amnesia) will be discussed. Matthew M. Botvinick

An introduction to cognitive brain functions, including higher perceptual functions, attention and selective perception, systems for short- and long-term memory, language, cerebral lateralization, motor control, executive functions of the frontal lobe, cognitive development and plasticity. Major neuropsychological syndromes (e.g., agnosia, amnesia) will be discussed. Matthew M. Botvinick

This seminar focuses on the recent explosion of interest in understanding the neural basis of valuation and decision making, and the resulting marriage between the formal rigor of economics and the empirical basis of psychology and neuroscience, termed "neuroeconomics". We will approach the question of how the brain makes economic decisions from multiple perspectives, drawing on theoretical, behavioral, and neural data from economics, psychology, and neurobiology. Major topics include: decision under risk and uncertainty; the role of learning in evaluating options; choice mechanisms; and multiplayer interactions and social decision making. Yael Niv

The goal of this course is to illuminate the interactions between the brain, body and behavior over the course of development and how this shapes a species' evolution. We will first explore developmental events at the cellular level that are shaped by parental behavior. We will then see how these events influence the developing circuits of the brain. Finally, we will learn about influences at the level of niche or culture, where the changes that organisms make to their environments and to themselves influence and modify the patterns of behaviors exhibited in the next generation. Asif A. Ghazanfar

This course explores the neural foundations of social cognition and social emotions. The objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of research topics relevant to the emerging field of social neuroscience. We will also discuss questions that cut across the specific topics that will be covered. Do neural systems exist that are specialized for social cognition or do the systems that participate in social cognition have more general cognitive functions? Can neuroscientific research shed new light on social cognition? How can different disciplines in neuroscience and the social sciences contribute to social neuroscience research? Uri Hasson

In this course, we will examine how the nervous system controls movements, how the brain handles enormous computational complexities of movement, how motor skills are learned and consolidated, and how the motor system influences cognition. Jordan A. Taylor

The brain is made up of billions of neurons, each sending and receiving signals from thousands of other neurons. This densely connected network of neurons gives rise to rich spatial and temporal dynamics. This course will investigate these dynamics. The course will present experimental results from systems-level neuroscience and then discuss the theoretical implications of these findings, particularly as they relate to higher-order, cognitive behaviors. Timothy J. Buschman